How to Make DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike

How to Make DIY Pannier Bags for your Bike

DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike
DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike
DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike
How to Make DIY Bike Pannier Bags
How to Make DIY Bike Pannier Bags
I’m sure you know by now about the love affair I have with my bike. (See Exhibits A, B, and C for starters.) It’s the Pure City Crosby Bike and it’s the perfect everything — color, ride, size, shape. She was getting a little antsy for an adventure so we decided to take her to the beach, but I had the idea to deck her out ahead of time with some pretty pannier bags so that we could carry all of our beach gear on the back rack. This turned out to be maybe one of my favorite projects ever. It turned out to be simple to make while giving you a lot of bang for your DIY buck. The bags look great, they’re functional and sturdy, and you can use them at the beach or anywhere. Here’s how to make DIY pannier bags for your bike!

What are pannier bags?

First of all, in case you’re not in the know, pannier bags are similar to saddle bags. However, instead of being slung over a horse’s rear end you sling them over the back of a bicycle or motorcycle. They’re firmly attached so that they don’t shift during riding, and you can fill them with all of your belongings so that they are safely contained. Case in point: I was riding my bike once and had my (really expensive) camera in the front basket. I hit a hard bump and the camera went flying, landing in the gutter. I was shocked and my camera was busted. Probably should have had that baby in these pannier bags!

How to Make DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike

Materials

  • 2 bags – any bag from a sturdy material will work; the ones we used are out of stock but there are similar ones here
  • 2 wood squares that will fit inside and against the back of your bag (find them at a craft store)
  • bungee cords
  • lashing hooks
  • screws (2 packs of 8 – this package will come with the nuts you need as well)
  • flat washers
  • awl
  • hammer
  • crescent wrench
  • phillips screwdriver
  • scissors
  • drill with 1/8″ drill bit (this kit is actually pretty cool if you’re a weekend maker and need to get your tool collection started)

Make Time: 1 Hour
How to Make DIY Bike Pannier Bags

DIY Pannier Bike Bag Tutorial

Step 1

Drill three holes in each wood square — two on either edge of one side, and another one at the bottom center of the opposite side.

Step 2

Insert the wood square either into the back inside pocket of your bag (if it has a back pocket), or hold it against the inside back of the bag. Use an awl to poke from inside the bag, through each hole in the wood, and also through the outside of the bag. Be sure to keep the wood in place while you are making your holes so that they are all aligned. Remove the wood and use the awl to enlarge the holes so that they’re large enough to slip a screw through.

Step 3

Slip a screw through a plastic hook for one hole. Do the same for the other two holes also. Put the wood back in the bag aligned with the holes. Entering from the outside of the bag, insert a screw through the first hole. The hook will remain on the outside of the bag. Insert the screw until it pierces both the bag and the wood. On the open end of the screw, place a washer and a nut. Tighten the nut using the screwdriver and wrench. Repeat for all holes in each bag. The top two hooks will be placed with the rounded hook portion on top, and the bottom hook will have the rounded portion on the bottom.

Step 4

Use a hammer to break away the orange ball on two of your bungee tarp ties (maybe the most satisfying part!).

Step 5

Affix the bags to your bike! The top two hooks go over the top of the rack. Then hook a bungee around the bottom hook, down and through the bottom hole in the rack, back up and onto the same hook. Your bags are done!

Step 6

If you want to make a bonus towel holder, you’re almost finished. First, cut off the straps from one of the purses.

Step 7

Cut two 11″ sections from the strap, while trying not to include any buckles or holes.

Step 8

Use the awl to puncture a hole on either end of each strap, approximately 3/4″ from the end.

Step 9

Use the same technique from Step 3 to affix a hook into each hole.

Step 10

Roll and place your towel on top of the back rack. Hook one strap over each end of the towel. You’re ready to roll!
How to Make DIY Bike Pannier Bags
How to Make DIY Bike Pannier Bags
Maybe one of the coolest things about the project is that one bag that still has its strap, so you can tuck the strap inside while you travel and also unhook the bag and use it as a purse! Just pull the strap out and tuck the bungee cord inside while you’re walking around. Then you can also reattach it when you’re ready to roll. This was such a fun one to make (and use!), so I hope you try it  — now that you know how to make DIY pannier bags for your bike. See ya at the beach! xoxo
DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike
DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike
DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike
DIY Pannier Bags for Your Bike
Product for this post graciously provided by Pure Cycles.
SaveSave
SaveSave
SaveSave
SaveSave

How to Make a Modern Woven Wreath for Your Spring Decor

how to make a woven wreath
how to make a woven wreath

how to make a woven wreathThis post is sponsored by Michaels. All ideas and opinions are my own. Thank you for being supportive of the partners who help keep Lovely Indeed rocking!

Weaving has always intimidated me, but now I’m not really sure why! This was my first toe in the water when it comes to weaving and suffice it to say, everyone I know is getting something woven come Christmas. It’s SO COOL. It’s just so fascinating to see it come together as you weave those babies in and out. Now here’s the deal. I’m by no means a weaver, and I don’t even actually know the technical terms for a lot of what I did. So if you want to follow the step-by-step for this one, I’ll try to make it as clear as possible. Down below I’ve linked to a weaving references that should help if you get stuck. And now! In the spirit of spring and new beginnings, here’s how to make a modern woven wreath for and freshen up your spring decor!
Materials

  • wreath form
  • plain cotton yarn
  • more yarn or roving in various colors, weights, and textures
  • pompom maker
  • scissors
  • tapestry needle or yarn needle
  • optional: plastic fork

Make Time: 3 Hours
Step 1: Tie one end of the plain yarn around the back of a rung on your wreath form. Wind it around and around the wreath form until you arrive back at your original piece. I recommend keeping a set number of wraps within each section of the wreath form for regularity. Tie the loose end to the wreath. This is called the warp.
how to make a woven wreath
Step 2: Now prepare to start your weft. If you were weaving on a regular loom, this process would look a little different, but here’s what I found to work best on the wreath form. Thread your tapestry needle with your choice of yarn or roving. Start by inserting the needle through the back and up through the front of the wreath form, pulling through a foot or two of length to work with. Then start weaving. You can go under and over every line of the warp if you wish, but I chose to go over every two and under every two. I felt like this helped the round shape of the wreath keep its form nicely and not get too tight. So start working over and under, pulling the yarn as taut as you’d like. I was working with that white fluffy yarn that you see on the first row, so the stitches made a bubble shape. To finish off a strand of yarn just weave it through the back of the wreath and tie off somewhere convenient.
how to make a woven wreath
Step 3: Probably some high-key weavers are going to get annoyed by this, but next I put in some accents of really thick roving. I wanted to plan out where those would be ahead of time, so I added them at this step. These are the pink accents you see below. Use the same over-under technique to add these accents.
how to make a woven wreath
Step 4: Next I wanted some thinner roving, which you see in the yellow stitches. To do this, use the same technique we used in Step 2. You’ll find that the stitches take longer to add up with the thinner yarns (obviously). You’ll also want to keep scooting your lines of weft close together to create that tight woven pattern. Someone once told me a plastic fork works well for this and it totally did! You can use the tines to get into the warp and skootch the weft closer together. Weave your weft as you like, in various patterns or colors.
how to make a woven wreath

Step 5: After I finished the yellow weft I filled in with more thick white weft using the same process.
Step 6: Add pompoms if you like! We have a tutorial on making pompoms here. We just left two long strands of yarn on our pompoms, weaved them through the wreath form, and tied them around the back to secure.
Yayyyyyy! I kind of love it. And now I’m not scared to try a larger weaving on a loom, which I’ve been wanting to do forever for the master bedroom. So stay tuned for that. If you need a little extra help in the weaving department, we referenced this post a lot and it was very helpful! Also, we found all of our materials at Michaels — and I’m excited to say that I joined the Michaels Makers program for another year, which helps me bring you fun projects like this one. 🙂 Wait til you see what we’re dreaming up next! xoxo
This post is sponsored by Michaels. All ideas and opinions are my own. Thank you for being supportive of the partners who help keep Lovely Indeed rocking!
how to make a woven wreath
how to make a woven wreath
how to make a woven wreath